Monthly Archives: November 2012

Solidarity or Exclusion? British Columbia Unions and Chinese Mineworkers

It’s obvious why HD Mining is hiring workers in China to work at the Murray River Coal Project in Northern British Columbia. Because they are admitted to Canada on work visas under the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP), the company can pay them a lot less than it would have to pay Canadian citizens or permanent residents.

The owners of HD Mining are no doubt thankful that the Tory federal government has been expanding the TFWP, allowing employers in more sectors to bring in migrant workers. This move by Harper & Co. is part of their broader austerity agenda, which includes lowering wages and increasing insecurity among working people.

Solidarity or Exclusion? British Columbia Unions and Chinese Mineworkers | Global Research

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Solidarity or Exclusion? British Columbia Unions and Chinese Mineworkers

By David Camfield

It’s obvious why HD Mining is hiring workers in China to work at the Murray River Coal Project in Northern BC. Because they are admitted to Canada on work visas under the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP), the company can pay them a lot less than it would have to pay Canadian citizens or permanent residents.

The owners of HD Mining are no doubt thankful that the Tory federal government has been expanding the TFWP, allowing employers in more sectors to bring in migrant workers. This move by Harper & Co. is part of their broader austerity agenda, which includes lowering wages and increasing insecurity among working people.

Solidarity or Exclusion? British Columbia Unions and Chinese Mineworkers

Constructed categories

Avoiding the race to the bottom

Every year about 300,000 people enter the Canadian labour market as temporary migrant workers, more than the 230,000 who enter as permanent residents on their way to acquiring full rights as citizens.

By being categorized as migrant workers by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, these hundreds of thousands of people are denied basic rights that citizens often take for granted.

As of April 2012, it is legal to pay migrant workers classified as “low-skilled” a wage five per cent less than the average, and migrant workers classified as “high-skilled” a wage 15 per cent lower than the average.

Constructed categories – Briarpatch Magazine

Canada’s foreign worker progrm to be reviewed

Harper government says it believes Canadians must always have first crack at job opportunities

Canada’s foreign worker program to be reviewed after hiring of Chinese coal miners in B.C.

Tim Hortons workers file double-double rights complaint

Four temporary foreign workers from Mexico who worked for Tim Hortons in northern B.C. have filed a human rights complaint alleging their boss exploited and discriminated against them by doubling their rent and the bunks in their rooms.

Eugene Kung, a lawyer with the B.C. Public Interest Advocacy Centre, says the four were working at two Tim Hortons locations in Dawson Creek.

Tim Hortons workers file double-double rights complaint – British Columbia – CBC News

Chinese-backed Mining Firm in Early Talks to Train in BC

Opponents of temporary foreign workers in British Columbian mines say one firm’s assertions it wants to help train local miners after it already filled jobs with non-Canadian labour shows the company wasn’t prepared for its projects.

The Tyee – Chinese-backed Mining Firm in Early Talks to Train in BC

Temporary workers in Canada ‘without rights’

Guatemalan farmer back in Canada, but this time to speak about treatment of migrant workers

 

OTTAWA — Jose Sicajau is finally back in Canada, but not the way he wants to be.

The farmer from Guatemala would like to be working on a Canadian farm for several months, harvesting cabbage and peppers, and earning triple the money he could make back home.